Transplant Faculty

Our Vision: Creating a new future for patients with organ failure through extraordinary transplant innovation, education, and compassionate care.

Dr. Carlos O. Esquivel, MD, PhD

Division Chief, Carlos O. Esquivel, M.D., Ph.D., FACS

Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professor in Pediatric Transplantation in the School of Medicine, Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) and of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

Carlos O. Esquivel, M.D., Ph.D. is Professor of Surgery and by courtesy Professor of Pediatrics at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Chief of the Division of Abdominal Transplantation and the Associate Director of the Institute of Immunity, Transplantation and Infection, an umbrella institute that fosters interdisciplinary research between basic scientists and clinicians. Dr. Esquivel is the first recipient of the Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professorship in Transplantation. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Costa Rica School of Medicine, completed general surgery training at the University of California Davis under the tutelage of F. William Blaisdell,  and then obtained a doctoral degree from the University of Lund in Sweden under the mentorship of Prof. Sven-Erick Bergentz.  He trained in transplantation of the liver, kidney, pancreas and intestine at the University of Pittsburgh under the direction of Dr. Thomas Starzl. In 1988, he founded the adult and pediatric liver and intestinal transplant programs at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. In 1995 he was recruited to Stanford to start the Abdominal Pediatric Transplant Programs at Stanford Children’s and rebuild the Adult Liver and Kidney Transplant Programs.  Under his guidance, his team has performed more than 5000 abdominal transplants during a span of almost 25 years.

Dr. Esquivel is recognized worldwide as an expert and pioneer in transplantation. He is a creative and productive investigator having contributed over 500 publications in the medical literature and given over 200 lectures throughout the United States and internationally. He oversees multiple basic science and clinical research projects and is currently PI for a 5-year, multi-center NIH grant to develop biomarkers for Epstein-Barr Virus-induced post-transplant lymphomas in children.  As a transplant leader at Stanford and in key national and international societies, he promotes team cooperation, embraces change and creates an environment for fostering discovery, and for training leaders of the future.  In recognition of his many contributions to surgical education, Dr. Esquivel received the American Society of Transplant Surgeons 2015 Francis Moore Excellence in Mentorship in the Field of Transplantation Award.  In spring of 2019, Dr. Esquivel was elected as President-Elect of the International Pediatric Transplant Association, a position held for 2 years prior to assuming presidency.

C. Andrew Bonham, MD, FACS

C. Andrew Bonham, MD, FACS

Associate Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

Dr. Bonham is Associate Professor of Surgery in the Division of Abdominal Transplantation, Director of the Adult & Pediatric Living Donor Programs and Director of the Intestinal Transplant Program. His general surgery training was at Cornell University Medical School. He received advanced fellowship training in transplantation from the University of Pittsburgh under the direction of Dr. Thomas Starzl. Dr. Bonham joined the Stanford Division of Abdominal Transplant in 2002. In addition to adult and pediatric liver and intestine transplantation and hepatobiliary surgery, he has expertise in combined en bloc heart/liver transplantation, a technique perfected at Stanford for patients suffering from congenital heart disease and cirrhosis. His research interests include stem cell biology, particularly as it relates to organ regeneration, and immunologic tolerance. He has directed clinical trials to establish tolerance after liver transplantation, successfully maintaining a number of patients off all immunosuppression for periods as long as 12 years.

Stephan Busque, MD, FACS

Stephan Busque, MD, FACS

Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

Amy Gallo, MD

Amy Gallo, MD

Assistant Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

Dr. Gallo graduated from Yale University for college (1997) followed by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (2002). She completed her general surgery residency (2009) and transplant surgery fellowship (2011) both at Stanford University. She is currently certified in general surgery and abdominal transplantation and stayed on as faculty at Stanford after completing her training.

She is an assistant professor of surgery in the Division of Transplant Surgery with expertise in adult and pediatric liver and kidney transplants. She is also the Associate Director of the Pediatric Kidney and the Director of the Living Donor Pediatric Kidney Transplant Programs at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital.

Her research interests include studying and rethinking outcomes for pediatric transplant recipients, with a specific interest in making transplants more assessable to children deemed untransplantable by the transplant community. She has also worked to assess biomarkers for rejection and other non-invasive measures for determining graft function and longevity. She is also interested in bring uterus transplant to the west coast.

Sheri Krams, PhD

Sheri Krams, PhD
Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation)

Dr. Sheri M. Krams is currently Professor of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Transplantation and the School of Medicine’s Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs.

A faculty member with the Stanford University School of Medicine since 1995, Dr. Krams has a track record of excellence as a researcher and is highly regarded as a strong advocate for trainees. In December, she was appointed Associate Dean of Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs, where she has supported trainees’ academic and professional development, enhanced diversity in the biosciences, and strengthened training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars.

Throughout her career, Dr. Krams has proven to be a dedicated and motivational teacher. She also has received numerous awards for her mentorship, including the Stanford School of Medicine Office of Graduate Education Award for Excellence in Diversity and Inclusion (2019), Stanford School of Medicine’s Excellence in Teaching Award (2014), and The Transplantation Society’s International Basic Science Mentor Award (2010).  Among many other roles, Dr. Krams has served as chair of pre-doctoral admissions in the Immunology Graduate Program since 2012 and on Stanford University’s Committee of Graduate Admissions and Policy since 2010.

As a researcher in the Division of Abdominal Transplantation, Dr. Krams has made numerous discoveries that have helped improve outcomes for recipients of organ transplants. Her work has focused on defining the role of NK cells in response to viral and allo-antigen and led to a paradigm shift by demonstrating that NK cells directly influence the immune response after solid organ transplantation and contribute to both acute and chronic allograft rejection. Recent studies, using both experimental models and human immunology, define how exosomes and microRNAs regulate immune responses after transplantation. Dr. Krams was elected as an American Society of Transplantation fellow in 2015, two years after receiving the organization’s Basic Science Investigator Award.

Olivia Martinez, PhD

Olivia Martinez, PhD
Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation)

Dr. Olivia M. Martinez is currently Professor of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Transplantation, and Vice Chair of Basic & Translational Research in the Department of Surgery.  She is also the Director of Stanford Immunology and Director of the PhD Program in Immunology at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Dr. Martinez received her Ph.D. in Immunology from the University of California, Berkeley.  She is the recipient of a number of awards and honors including the Fujisawa Basic Science Award, the Office of Graduate Education Faculty Award for Student Service, the Stanford Biosciences Faculty Award for Excellence in Mentoring, and a Fellow of the American Society of Transplantation. Her distinguished career and outstanding contributions as a researcher, teacher, and leader were recently recognized by the AAI where she was named a Distinguished Fellow.

Dr. Martinez has established a leading research program on viral immunity and regulation of the immune response to cellular and solid organ grafts.  She is also a widely recognized expert on the development of post-transplant malignancies including virally-induced B cell lymphomas and this work has led to improved diagnosis and management of transplant recipients.

Dr. Martinez is author of over 130 original research publications, review articles, book chapters and conference proceedings.  Her laboratory has been funded by the NIH for over 25 years and has also been supported by the Roche Organ Transplant Research Foundation, the American Heart Association, and the Department of Defense

Marc Melcher, MD, PhD, FACS

Marc Melcher, MD, PhD, FACS
Associate Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

Dr. Marc L. Melcher graduated from Harvard (1989) with high honors and Columbia College of Physician and Surgeon (1999) where he was inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha.  In between these degrees, he earned a Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of California, Berkeley.  He completed general surgery training at Stanford University and his abdominal transplant surgery (2004) fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco (2006).

Dr. Melcher joined the Stanford Division of Abdominal Transplantation in 2006. He has served as the Program Director of the General Surgery Residency and currently is the Program Director of the Abdominal Transplant Surgery Fellowship.

K. Thomas Pham, MD

K. Thomas Pham, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Abdominal Transplantation

Dr. Pham completed his medical degree at the University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine in 2007.  He then completed his general surgery residency at The Ohio State University Medical Center in 2014.  Dr. Pham received The National Kidney Foundation, Folkert Belzer MD Research Award from American Society of Transplant Surgeons in 2010 to support him during his post-doctoral research where he studied the alloantibody response following hepatocellular transplantation.  During that time he also obtained a Masters in Medical Science in 2011 from The Ohio State University School of Medicine.  He then complete his Abdominal Transplant Surgery Fellowship at the Stanford School of Medicine in 2016.  He is board certified in general surgery.

Dr. Pham joined Stanford Abdominal Transplant Surgery in 2018.  He is currently a Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Abdominal Transplantation.  Dr. Pham also serves as the Associate Program Director of the Stanford Abdominal Transplant Surgery Fellowship.  He maintains a practice at Stanford Health Care and Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital.

Research interests include tolerance induction following kidney transplantation, outcomes research in single and multi-organ transplant recipients and implications paired kidney exchange in highly sensitized individuals.